State-Confessional Relations in Russia in a Pandemic: Challenges and Answers

Cover Page

Abstract


The article discusses the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the rhetoric of Russian representatives of traditional religions (Islam and Orthodoxy). As a context of this process, the author defines the contradictory trends taking place in society: trust / distrust of the state and religious institutions; strengthening / weakening of rationalism and trust in science, in particular medicine. The author used the concept of “biopolitics” by Michel Foucault, the concept of “anthropocentric authoritarianism” by David Chandler, the concept of the crisis of “prevailing globalization” by Jean Baudrillard as a methodology. In general, according to the author, despite the manifestations of fundamentalism in Orthodoxy, religious leaders supported the state’s position to quarantine and restrict the access of believers to churches, did not reject the scientific explanation for the pandemic, and proceeded from ideas about the social responsibility of the church, public solidarity, and the general fate of the entire population of Russia. At the same time, in the situation of an indefinitely long pandemic and the associated economic crisis, traditional religious structures have to find a middle path between modernists and fundamentalists in their ranks, as well as develop their own position in relation to the inevitable strengthening of state control over citizens.


About the authors

Yuri M. Pochta

Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University)

Author for correspondence.
Email: pochta_yum@pfur.ru
6, Miklukho-Maklaya St, Moscow, 117198, Russian Federation

Doctor of Philosophy, Professor, Department of Comparative Politics, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

References

  1. Foucault M. Discipline and punish. The birth of the prison. Moscow: Ad Margin Press; 2018. (In Russ.).
  2. Latour B. Is This a Dress Rehearsal? (March 26, 2020). URL: https://critinq.wordpress.com/ 2020/03/26/is-this-a-dress-rehearsal/. Accessed: 10.06.2020. (In Russ.).
  3. Chandler D. Biopolitics and the rise of “anthropocentric authoritarianism”. Russia in global politics. 2020; 3, May/June. URL: https://globalaffairs.ru/articles/biopolitika-avtoritarizma/#_ftn20. Accessed: 10.06.2020. (In Russ.).
  4. Przeworski A. Physical survival is imperative; everything else is luxury. Russia in global politics. 2020; 3, May/June. URL: https://globalaffairs.ru/articles/fizicheskoe-vyzhivanie-imperativ/. Accessed: 10.06.2020. (In Russ.).
  5. Baudrillard J. The spirit of terrorism. There was no war in the Gulf. Moscow: RIPOL classic; 2016. (In Russ.).
  6. Braterskiy M. Is it far from the war? Russia in global politics. 2020; 3, May/June. URL: https://globalaffairs.ru/articles/daleko-li-do-vojny/. Accessed: 10.06.2020. (In Russ.).
  7. Lieven A. Coronavirus as a mirror: what do we see? Russia in global politics. 2020; 3, May/June. URL: https://globalaffairs.ru/articles/korona-zerkalo-obshhestva/. Accessed: 10.06.2020. (In Russ.).
  8. Kapustin B.G. The bluff civilization. Russia in global politics. 2020; 3, May/June. URL: https://globalaffairs.ru/articles/czivilizacziya-blefa/?fbclid=IwAR1k--YLF35gCYkBYwPx DT_rfiWGjdE_xe9ICXiRj9c4v7ZQucqEiSdLnCk. Accessed: 10.06.2020. (In Russ.).

Statistics

Views

Abstract - 337

PDF (Russian) - 67

Cited-By


PlumX

Dimensions


Copyright (c) 2020 Pochta Y.M.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

This website uses cookies

You consent to our cookies if you continue to use our website.

About Cookies