DISTRIBUTION OF THE GENUS CEDRELA IN ECUADOR

Cover Page
  • Authors: Llerena S.A.1, Salinas N.2, Oliveira O.L.3, Jadán-Guerrero M.4, Segovia-Salcedo C.4
  • Affiliations:
    1. Department of Ecology. Peoples Friendship University of Russia
    2. Department of Horticultural Sciences University of Florida
    3. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Federal University of Viçosa
    4. Departamento de Ciencias de la Vida y Agricultura. Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE
  • Issue: Vol 26, No 1 (2018)
  • Pages: 125-133
  • Section: Biological resources
  • URL: http://journals.rudn.ru/ecology/article/view/19271
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.22363/2313-2310-2018-26-1-125-133
  • Cite item

Abstract


The genus Cedrela in Ecuador has four species: C. odorata, C. montana, C. fissilis and C. nebulosa. Cedrela was one of the economically most important timber in the past, due to its wood properties. The genus has a long history of overharvesting and selective logging; as a consequence a substantial genetic degradation have occurred in Ecuador. Currently, three species of Cedrela are included in the IUCN Red List. C. odorata and C. nebulosa are listed as vulnerable species and C. fissilis as endangered species. In spite of their conservation status and priority, few studies related to geographical distribution have been done. Then, the geographic distribution at local level had been carried out to provide a valuable tool to the conservation and management of these species. Field sampling and herbarium compilation showed C. montana is restricted to the Ecuadorian highlands in the western and eastern Andean montane region between 805 to 3200 masl (meters above sea level). Cedrela nebulosa is located in Andean region about 1400 to 2300 masl. C. odorata is the most widely distributed, occupying areas in the Amazon (200-1300 masl), Pacific (330-825 masl) and insular regions (350 masl). While, Cedrela fissilis is only found in the Amazon Region about 200 to 510 masl. This basic information about current distribution and abundance of cedar species is primordial to generate sufficient tools to formulate the strategies of management and conservation of these species in the country. The widespread distribution of C. odorata have been found in the Amazonian and Pacific regions, indicating that it is adapted to tropical rainforest and tropical monsoon climates. To prove if there are adaptations to both habitats morphological, ecological and phylogenetic studies must be carried out.

About the authors

Silvia Alejandra Llerena

Department of Ecology. Peoples Friendship University of Russia

Email: alellerenag@gmail.com
8/5, Podol’skoe shosse, Moscow, 115093, Russian Federation Master in Ecology and Nature Management, Department of Ecology. Peoples Friendship University of Russia

Natalia Salinas

Department of Horticultural Sciences University of Florida

Email: alellerenag@gmail.com
Florida, 32611, United States PhD (c), Department of Horticultural Sciences. University of Florida. United States

Orlando Luiz Oliveira

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Federal University of Viçosa

Email: alellerenag@gmail.com
Av. Peter Henry Rolfs, s/n - University Campus, Viçosa-MG, 36570-900, Brazil PhD genetics and plant breeding, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Federal University of Viçosa. Brazil-MG.

Mónica Jadán-Guerrero

Departamento de Ciencias de la Vida y Agricultura. Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE

Email: alellerenag@gmail.com
Av. General Rumiñahui S/N, Sangolquí, 171103, Ecuador PhD (c), Departamento de Ciencias de la Vida y Agricultura. Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE. Av. General Rumiñahui S/N. Sangolquí. Ecuador.

Claudia Segovia-Salcedo

Departamento de Ciencias de la Vida y Agricultura. Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE

Email: alellerenag@gmail.com
Av. General Rumiñahui S/N, Sangolquí, 171103, Ecuador PhD in Molecular Systematics, Departamento de Ciencias de la Vida y Agricultura. Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE. Av. General Rumiñahui S/N. Sangolquí. Ecuador

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Copyright (c) 2018 Llerena S.A., Salinas N., Oliveira O.L., Jadán-Guerrero M., Segovia-Salcedo C.

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